Tag: social networks

Social Marketing for Photographers: Branded Quotes

 

 

As part of the never-ending process of brand marketing that every photographer must practice, I’ve reached that point when it is imperative that I employ the social sites that will push said branding to the next level.

This form of Social Marketing is vital to your growth if you plan to compete with the hundreds of shooters who have already learned to embrace the Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram trends that your potential clients prefer.

Starting with my favorite watermarking program, a few dozen of my favorite ‘catchy yet generic’  images are converted to Web-friendly lightweights with a prominent watermark both low and easy to read, while at the same time faded to 50% so as to not distract from the impending messages to be added later.  These then become my templates for the quotes and statements that will serve as the actual message of the shared image.

The template shown here is 650 x 750 pixels wide to comply with the standard format of most Facebook and Instagram image preferences.genius

In truth, Facebook users seem to prefer their images of this type, commonly known as “memes” to be 650×650 pxls, because it displays best with the new ad features that FB is cramming into their mobile screens.   However, I chose to stand out just a bit by adding the width that I think displays better on tablets and computer screens, because my target audience is a bit older and prone to browse more casually on the tablet.

 

As you can see, the basic message has a rather wide appeal among adults of all ages, and you can target your audience even more closely by selecting quotes that will tap into their individual perspectives.

As with all other forms of promotion, you also want to keep the basic principles of marketing in mind that will apply here, especially the K.I.S.S. rule:  Keep It Simple, Stupid.

These branded quote images are exploding on all the big social sites, and while the vast majority of your clients and competitors continue to call them memes, should you take the time to market them right (sparingly, maybe 1 per week, per site) you will soon see them as Me!Me! s that tend to scream your brand as they are shared hundreds, or even thousands of times.

As with nearly everything else on social sites, you can reasonably expect the lifespan of your new meme to sputter after 30 days, and to fall to the wayside after 60 days.  This is why you are launching a new meme every week.

You will soon realize that you have created a constantly evolving web of branded images, being shared by your friends, your page fans, and their friends as each image cycles down to make room for the next. This social promotion cycle is the 21st century equivalent of the affiliate marketing phase that swept the Web in the 90s.

 

2015  J.B. Stran

Thieves Are Using Facebook To Plan ‘Flashrob’ Swarms

Thieves Are Using Facebook To Plan ‘Flashrob’ Swarms

Petty criminals in Washington, DC are reportedly using Facebook and Twitter to plan raids on local stores, breaking new ground in idiotic criminal tactics.

DC police said a group stole lingerie from a Victoria’s Secret after apparently coordinating the attack on Twitter or Facebook. Other officers and merchants around Georgetown University were quoted in the Daily Mail reporting similar incidents.

via Thieves Are Using Facebook To Plan ‘Flashrob’ Swarms.

NYPD ‘Social Media Unit’ to Facebook Stalk Criminals

Steel yourself for what will surely become the most sedentary spin-off Law & Order yet: The NYPD has announced the formation of a new division, the Social Media Unit, which will solve crimes by Facebook stalking people. Assistant Commissioner Kevin O’Connor (no relation) will head up the unit.

As a gang intelligence officer, O’Connor apparently jumped into social media with the zeal of a middle-aged guy who really hates gangbangers. He is credited with using social media to nab shooters, stabbers, and gay-bashers. Loathe be the teenager in his extended family who dares upload an underage party picture to Facebook. [NYDN, Image of the NYPD Real Time Crime Center ca. 2006 via AP]

via NYPD ‘Social Media Unit’ to Facebook Stalk Criminals.

Google+ is (not officially) a new Facebook competitor (pt 1)

Google’s latest attempt at social

This isn’t everything there is to know about Google+, and the Google+ Project has only just begun. If Google has its way, it will live on for years… It’s just too early to tell.
Should you have an interest in taking a look, here’s a few Fun Facts about the new social offering from Google.

1. Google+ is currently available on an invitation-only basis.

2. Google does not consider it a Facebook competitor (at least publicly).

3. Google+ is currently available for download as an app in the Android Market.

4. When you download that app, it splits off the “Huddle” feature as a separate app.

5. Users can post status updates, and these appear on the Google Profile under a tab called “Posts”. The +1’s and Buzz tabs remain separate. I have to wonder if we’ll see Buzz and Posts merge eventually.

6. What is available now is “just the beginning” according to Google. These are just the first features or presumably many more to come.

7. Circles is one current feature. It lets you share things with different people (kind of like Facebook Groups) but with a very different user interface. Watch this video.

8. Another feature is Sparks. This looks for videos and articles it thinks you’ll like, so “when you’re free, there’s always something to watch, read, and share.” Filter Bubble anyone?

9. Hangouts is another feature. It’s basically group video chat. Google describes it as “the unplanned meet-up.”

10. Instant uploads is a mobile-specific feature. Photos upload themselves as you take them, and are stored in a private area on the cloud.

11. Huddle is another group-conversation feature for mobile. Essentially, it’s group chat.

The Stream

12. The stream is basically the equivalent of the Facebook news feed.

13. When you share something with Google+ it’s added to your stream and the stream of everyone you shared with.

14. The stream shows you what all of your Circles have shared with you.

15. If you mention a user, using the “+” or “@” symbols, the person may receive a notification that you mentioned them.

16. You can see who specific posts were shared with in the stream — whether they were shared publicly, to extended circles, or a limited group.

17. You can filter the stream by specific Circles.

18. You can chat directly in the stream

19. You can report inappropriate content.

20. You can search for people from the search box at the top of the stream.

21. Soon, Google says you’ll be able to search the stream itself from the search box.

22. If you leave comments on a post, you can edit or delete them.

23. The same goes for posts, but you can’t edit a post’s sharing settings after the post has been shared. However, you can delete the post and share again to different circles.

24. You can “reshare” posts made by others (like retweeting).

25. You can “mute” a post. This will let you stop receiving updates from a post, like if the comments get out of control for example.

…more to follow…